FanPost

Controversial Obstacles

I have finally come back from my year long hibernation and am starting to post more on ANW nation. Today I am going to talk about 3 obstacles that caused a bit of controversy (In my opinion.) Don't bash me in the comments for not putting other obstacles in here because I will make a part 2. You can give me suggestions though.

1. Grim Sweeper-

Oh goodness. Where do I start with this one. So, if you didn't know this (and you probably do) Wingnut alley was used as the second to last obstacle of stage 2. It was very difficult and made stage two a difficult course only the best could get passed, and we liked it that way. But in order to get more publicity, ANW decided to nerf stage 2 and replace wingnut alley with something called the grim sweeper. I'll spare your the details, but only one person failed on the obstacle because they were too tall, and even they got to try it again with the power tower pass. It let a record breaking 13 competitors complete the stage.

2. Angry Birds

I remember the day after the Baltimore City Finals and ANW nation was crowded with a bunch of hate posts on the brand new obstacle, angry birds. Oh boy. This obstacles required many transitions between "rocks" on a spinning bar similar to hourglass drop. But, what was so difficult with this obstacle was that you had to make a transition that completely changed your grip on the obstacle. If you went too far, you would miss the hand holds and slip off. If you went too little, your hands wouldn't be able to reach it. It required a massive amount of precision, and only one lucky course tester was able to make the transition.

3. The wedge

So I used to like this obstacle until I realized how much of a pain this obstacle actually is. There was a bunch of technical issues with it and you had to be extremely lucky. It became an obstacle that required precision and luck more than actual skill. Countless of ninjas have failed this obstacle, so I'm glad it is not coming back.

This is a FanPost and does not necessarily reflect the views of American Ninja Warrior Nation's writers or editors, or of NBC.